Newsletter 167 – February 2011

——– MANTEX NEWSLETTER ——–

Number 167 – February 2011 – ISSN 1470-1863

Arts, Culture, and Technology as seen from
the digital hub of Media city Manchester UK

** 13,000+ subscribers will see your AD **

0— Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ – Literary Mashups

Everybody knows the story of Dracula – or do they?
There’s a lot going on underneath the blood-letting,
garlic bouquets, and damsels in distress.

If you’ve not read it before, you might be amazed
to learn that it’s set in Whitby, Exeter, and London,
plus Translylvania of course.

The latest in our series of mashups gives you
the plot, the characters, and access to the full
length film version of the 1922 classic ‘Nosferatu’.
Plus some thought-provoking commentary.

Mantex Newsletter Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’

0— Pub Quiz Question #1

What is the highest number in a Soduko puzzle?

0— Online Courses – New Low Prices

Thanks to a generous grant from the government,
we are now able to offer our online courses
at new low prices –

This is an experiment to make short and
self-contained courses available to everybody.

* Writing Essays
* Plagiarism
* Writing Reports
* Web Design
* Healthy Living
* Personal Development
* Stress Management
* Page Layout

redbtn Online Courses

0— Pub Quiz Question #2

What is the term for a positive electrode?

0— Dictionary of Media and Communications

I once bought a dictionary of computer technology
(as it was then called). It was huge, comprehensive,
and was written by an expert.

Twelve months later there were terms I needed to
look up that simply weren’t in there. That’s how
fast new language is being created in the field
of information technology (as it is now called).

This new publication from OUP tries to avoid this
problem by also supplying a web site, where the
most important terms are kept updated.

redbtn Dictionary of Media and Communications

0— Pub Quiz Question #3

What is a female deer called?

0— Virginia Woolf – on Video

She doesn’t exactly talk to camera, but these
are two documentary film on Woolf’s life and times
that have been uploaded in multiple parts to YouTube.

To save you the trouble of hunting around, we’ve
assembled them onto one handy page.

One provides social and historical background to
Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Group in general.

The other offers critical comment on the well
known issues of physical abuse, mental instability,
and suicide.

redbtn Virginia Woolf on Video

0— Pub Quiz Question #4

What can be an island, a sweater, or a potato?

0— The Total Library

Jorge Luis Borges is well known as a writer of short
stories. In fact, because he never produced any novels,
many people assume that he wrote very little.

The truth is that he never stopped writing – anything
from book reviews, essays, biographical sketches,
film reviews, and literary criticism of a very
personal kind..

This is a sample collection of his vast output, from
sketches he wrote in the 1920s

redbtn The Total Library

0— Pub Quiz Question #5

Who is the patron saint of music?

0— Information History in the Modern World

This collection of academic essays seeks to
put down markers and make a contribution to a
growing field of study – ‘the histories of information’.

The individual studies cover an amazing range of
topics and disciplines. They begin for instance with
the recording of personal identity in public information
systems. That is, the official data that tells you who
a person actually is.

The sources range from parish registers, lists of
vagrants and householders, birth and marriage certificates,
to the advent of ID numbers – which have still not
found favour in the UK.

There’s also a chapter on the design and completion
of official government census and tax return forms –

redbtn Information History in the Modern World

0— Pub Quiz Question #6

In which part of the body are Betz cells found?

0— Grammar Monster – F.r.e.e online checker

Grammar Monster is an online encyclopaedia
of everything you ever need to know about
English grammar.

It’s packed with simple explanations of all
those knotty issues of misplaced apostrophes,
split infinitives, and case agreement.

Recent additions include f.r.e.e tests in
which you can check your understanding.

There’s also a downloadable Windows app
version for GBP 9.40

redbtn Grammar Monster

If you’re interested in mastering grammar, you
might like our English Language app which does
the same thing – and is only GBP 4.95

redbtn English Language 3.0

0— Pub Quiz Question #7

In which Puccini opera does Mimi appear?

0— Marking Time

Want to set your watch and see a cute
piece of animation at the same time?
Have a look at Industrious Clock by
Yugo Nakamura. It’s simple but clever.

redbtn Marking Time

0— Pub Quiz Question #8

What do the numbers add up to on opposite sides of a dice?

0— Economist Online Style Guide

The Economist is rightly renowned for the
clarity of its house style. They have an
online service offering advice on good
writing practice.

It includes tips on how to avoid common
errors and solecisms, and an online quiz to
test your writing skills.

redbtn Economist Online Style Guide

If you want the complete style guide in book
form, have look at the details here –

redbtn Economist Style Guide – the book

0— Pub Quiz Question #9

Who wrote “The Pit and the Pendulum”?

0— Corrections

Lots of you were very quick to spot the
deliberate error in last month’s issue.

Writing on the subject of the Times paywall,
we attributed ownership to Robert Maxwell,
rather than Rupert Murdoch.

Well – they do have the same initials!

0— Pub Quiz Question #10

How many children were there in Enid Blyton’s ‘Famous Five’?

0— Pub quiz – ANSWERS

#1. What is the highest number in a Soduko puzzle?
ANSWER: Nine

#2 What is the term for a positive electrode?
ANSWER: Anode

#3 What is a female deer called?
ANSWER: Doe

#4 What can be an island, a sweater, or a potato?
ANSWER: Jersey

#5 Who is the patron saint of music?
ANSWER: Saint Cecilia

#6 In which part of the body are Betz cells found?
ANSWER: The brain

#7 In which Puccini opera does Mimi appear?
ANSWER: La Boheme

#8 What do the numbers add up to on opposite sides of a dice?
ANSWER: Seven

#9 Who wrote “The Pit and the Pendulum”?
ANSWER: Edgar Allen Poe

#10 How many children were there in Enid Blyton’s ‘Famous Five’?
ANSWER: Four – the other was a dog

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All Rights Reserved

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News-167-February-2011
ISSN 1470-1863
The British Library


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