Newsletter 125 – February 2007

——– MANTEX NEWSLETTER ——–

Number 125 – February 2007 – ISSN 1470-1863

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0— ‘Love Letters’ – book review

Leonard Woolf is best known as the
long-suffering husband of Virginia Woolf,
who he selflessly nursed through long
periods of mental and physical illness.

What’s not so well known is the fact
that as soon as she died he began a
relationship with a married woman that
lasted for the rest of his life.

He even went into business partnership
with her husband and bought the house
next door to them.

These are the letters he exchanged with
Trekkie Parsons, a woman who successfully
divided her time between the two men for
twenty-five years. The full story is here –

Love Letters

0— Pub quiz – Question #1

What is the capital of Ecuador?

0— JazzFM Redux!

I stumbled across the newly re-launched
Jazz-FM yesterday. It came up on DAB radio
and is also available via Sky Channel 0113
and NTL Digital Channel 1961, as well as online.

Good quality music, and NO announcements,
which is wonderful – except you sometimes
want to know who’s playing. It’s been
re-named The Jazz.

Even more surprising – no adverts. I assume
that this can’t last, and they’ ll seek
sponsorship revenue once they’ve built
up a fan base.

It’s a welcome addition to the paltry music
broadcasting scene in the UK. The playlist
is fresh too – not the same old stuff that
JazzFM used to recycle day after day.

0— Pub quiz – Question #2

Which card game features heels and nobs?

0— Totally Weird and Wonderful Words – new book

Do you know what ‘illecebrous’, ‘langsuir’,
and ‘telematology’ mean? No – I thought not.
They are ‘attractive’, ‘female vampire’, and
‘the study of peat bogs’ respectively. Not
many people know that.

Or did you know that there’s a term to describe
‘having a palate like that of an emu’? (It’s
‘dromaeognathous, just in case someone asks.)

This is a collection of outrageously obscure
words. You can either amaze your friends, or
just laugh at the New Yorker style cartoons.

Totally Weird and Wonderful Words

0— Pub quiz – Question #3

In which country is Fray Bentos a port?

0— DELETED ITEM [out of print]

0— Pub quiz – Question #4

What is a young hare called?

0— ‘Personal Record: 1920-1972’ – book review

Gerald Brenan wrote one of the best books
in English on the Spanish Civil War (‘The
Spanish Labyrinth’) and an amazingly popular
travel book ‘South from Granada’.

South from Granada

‘Personal Record’ is his autobiographical
account of the years 1920 to 1972, much of
it focused on his bohemian existence as he
shuttled between Bloomsbury and self-imposed
exile in Andalucia.

An affair with the painter Dora Carrington
dominates his erotic imagination until her
suicide in 1934.

Along the way there are vivid portraits of
Bloomsbury figures such as Lytton Strachey,
Leonard and Virginia Woolf, and David Garnett.

Full account of his adventures here –

Gerald Brenan: A Personal Record

0— Pub quiz – Question #5

How many edges does a 50 pence piece have?

0— DELETED ITEM [out of print]

0— Pub quiz – Question #6

What is the main town of Jersey?

0— ‘Information Architecture’ [new third edition]

This is a major event in the world of Information
Architecture. The first edition of this book became
an instant classic. The third edition is not only
much bigger – it’s much better and more carefully
thought through.

Louis Rosenfeld and Peter Morville look at how
to design and organise large scale Web sites
today, in the light of all that has happened
in the last few years of what’s now called Web 2.0.

They cover all the major issues – navigation
systems, usability, labelling, information chunking,
and creating understandable structures. The new
information in this third enlarged edition also
includes resources and software which have been
created in the last few years of this rapidly
expanding profession. Full review here –

Information Architecture

0— Pub quiz – Question #7

For what is RADAR an acronym?

0— New Yorker – picture slide show

Each week in The New Yorker, the section
Goings On About Town opens with a photograph
of something that’s happening, or about to
happen, in New York.

They now offer a retrospective look at a
year of events. Photographs by Sylvia Plachy,
Brian Finke, Lisa Kereszi, Lauren Klain Carton,
Landon Nordeman, Yola Monakhov, and Gus Powell.

To view the slide show, click on the red link
in the Related Links box to the right.

New Yorker

0— Pub quiz – Question #8

What type of tree is the source of sago?

0— DELETED ITEM [out of print]

0— Pub quiz – Question #9

What was made by the Manhattan Project?

0— Local blog makes good!

When two or three active bloggers discover
that they all live in the same neighbourhood,
you can bet your life what happens next.

Yes – they start a community blog. And
that’s exactly what a group of us have
done where I live.

It’s a blatant mix of local gossip, moans
about the council, plus the nearest we can
get to celebrity news (local writers in our
case). And some nice piccies of course.

For your f.r.e.e slice of life in south
Manchester, go no further than –

heatonmoor.blogspot.com

0— Pub quiz – Question #10

Which ancient language is used in Buddhist ceremonies?

0— Reader’s Letters and Corrections

Two or three sharp-eyed subscribers wrote
to point out that the last issue for
January was number 124 – not 123 as it
said in the header.

0— Pub quiz – ANSWERS

#1 What is the capital of Ecuador?
ANSWER: Quito

#2 Which card game features heels and nobs?
ANSWER: Cribbage

#3 In which country is Fray Bentos a port?
ANSWER: Uruguay

#4 What is a young hare called?
ANSWER: A leveret

#5 How many edges does a 50 pence piece have?
ANSWER: Seven

#6 What is the main town of Jersey?
ANSWER: St Helier

#7 For what is RADAR an acronym?
ANSWER: Radio detecting and ranging

#8 What type of tree is the source of sago?
ANSWER: Palm tree

#9 What was made by the Manhattan Project?
ANSWER: The first atomic bomb

#10 Which ancient language is used in Buddhist ceremonies?
ANSWER: Pali

0— COMING SOON

Design Management

The Bloomsbury Group

CSS The Missing Manual

Dictionary of Rhymes

(c) Copyright 2007, MANTEX
All Rights Reserved

PO Box 100 Tel +44 0161 432 5811
Manchester
M20 6GZ UK www.mantex.co.uk

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News-125-February-2007
ISSN 1470-1863
The British Library


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